February 9th: Visions of Abolition: From Critical Resistance to a New Way of Life

Posted: February 15, 2015 in Uncategorized

MON FEB 9th
6:30-8:45PM

Location: London Public Library – 251 Dundas St (Stevenson Hunt Room)
Sponsored by: Cinema Politica and Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival
Facebook: Visions of Abolition
http://www.visionsofabolition.org/

The festival takes place on the lands of the Haudenosaunee, Anishinaabek, Huron-Wendat, and Attawandaron Peoples. All events are free (donations welcome), wheelchair accessible, and scent-reduced—please do not use or wear scented products, including essential oils.

Everyone is welcome! This is a FREE event offered by Cinema Politica in parternership with the London Public Library.

Organized by the Solidarity Film Coalition under the auspices of the London Chapter of the Council of Canadians.

Cosponsored by the London Public Library, the Prisoner’s Justice Film Festival, L.A.C.A.S.A. and Seeds of Hope,

Details:
http://www.cinemapolitica.org/london

Visions of Abolition is a feature length documentary about the prison industrial complex and the prison abolition movement.

Part I “Breaking down the Prison Industrial Complex” weaves together the voices of women caught in the criminal justice system, and leading scholars of prison abolition, examining the racial and gendered violence of the prison system. Our film features the work of Susan Burton, a formerly incarcerated mother who established A New Way of Life, a group of transition homes for women coming home from prison in South Los Angeles (39 mins).

Part II “Abolition: Past Present and Future,” documents the recent history of the prison abolition movement through the organizing efforts of Critical Resistance and explores the meaning of abolitionist politics. By focusing on the collaboration between Critical Resistance and A New Way of Life, (known as the L.E.A.D. Project) the second half of the film unfolds a vision of abolition in practice (48 mins).

*FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE*

‘Visions of Abolition’ documentary linked to Ontario migrant detentions and crisis at Elgin-Middlesex Detention Centre

In conjunction with the London Public Library (londonpubliclibrary.ca), Cinema Politica London (cinemapolitica.org/london) presents the documentary film Visions of Abolition on Monday February 9, 2015 starting at 7 pm, in the Stevenson & Hunt Room, London Public Library, 251 Dundas St.

“The reality is that colonialism and racism are still inextricably linked to higher incarceration rates of Indigenous people and People of Colour,” says Giselle Dias of the Prison Justice Film Festival. In the trailer (www.visionsofabolition.org/trailer.html), Angela Davis makes the connections between slavery, indentured servitude, and prisons. “Canadians must also see the links to the over-incarceration rates of Indigenous people to on-going colonization (reserves, residential schools, 1960’s scoop and now prisons).” continues Dias. “Our jails (including the Elgin-Middlesex Detention Centre outside London) are over-crowded and therefore dangerous because we continue to over-incarcerate people with mental health issues, homeless people, poor people, immigrants and refugees and other marginalized populations. We must start putting resources into housing, mental health services, harm reduction, addressing poverty and most importantly stop considering prisons a solution to social problems.”

Visions of Abolition is a new feature length documentary about the prison industrial complex and the prison abolition movement, in two parts. Part I “Breaking down the Prison Industrial Complex” weaves together the voices of women caught in the criminal justice system, and leading scholars of prison abolition, examining the racial and gendered violence of the prison system. Features the work of Susan Burton, a formerly incarcerated mother who established A New Way of Life, a group of transition homes for women coming home from prison in South Los Angeles. Part II “Abolition: Past Present and Future,” documents the recent history of the prison abolition movement through the organizing efforts of Critical Resistance and explores the meaning of abolitionist politics. By focusing on the collaboration between Critical Resistance and A New Way of Life, (known as the L.E.A.D. Project) the second half of the film unfolds a vision of abolition in practice.

Co-sponsored by the Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival (prisonjusticefilm.wordpress.com). Giselle Dias of the PJFF will be present for a brief moderated Question & Answer session after the film.

Join us to learn and discuss how our societies could look without prisons, and how communities can resist the Prison Industrial Complex. Visions of Abolition will screen in the Stevenson-Hunt rooms (opposite Wolf Hall), London Public Library, 251 Dundas St. Doors open at 6:30pm on Monday February 9.

Part of a monthly series of screenings by Cinema Politica London in partnership with the London Public Library (see www.cinemapolitica.org/london for details). For information about these screenings, please contact london@cinemapolitica.org or David Heap (djheap@uwo.ca or 519 859 3579). For the Prison Justice Film Festival, please contact Giselle Dias (519-282-9291). Doors open 6:00 pm for set-up. After introductory remarks, the film will start at 7:00 sharp. Late comers please enter through the door at the back of the room. Everyone is welcome! This is a FREE event offered by Cinema Politica in partnership with the London Public Library. FRAGRANCE FREE EVENT! Please be respectful of attendees who have serious allergies! This film event is free of charge and accessible. Underground parking (two hours free) can be validated at the Central Library welcome desk while it is open.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s