March 8: Inherent Rights and Land Defense

Posted: January 27, 2015 in Uncategorized

SUN MARCH 8
6-8PM

Location: Atlohsa, 343 Richmond St.
Sponsored by: Atlohsa Native Family Healing Services, Climate Justice London and Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival
Facebook:Inherent Rights and Land Defense
Accessibility Audit

The festival takes place on the lands of the Haudenosaunee, Anishinaabek, Huron-Wendat, and Attawandaron Peoples. All events are free (donations welcome), wheelchair accessible, and scent-reduced—please do not use or wear scented products, including essential oils.
Accessibility Info: Ramp and elevator to main building, with room and non-gendered washrooms on main floor.

How To Stop An Oil And Gas Pipeline: The Unist’ot’en Camp Resistance

Over the past four years, the Unist’ot’en clan of the Wet’suwet’en nation have literally built a strategy to keep three proposed oil and gas pipelines from crossing their land. Concerned about the environmental damage a leak could cause on land they’ve never given up, they’ve constructed a protection camp to block pipeline companies. As opposition to the development of Alberta’s tar sands and to fracking projects grows across Canada, with First Nations communities on the front lines, the Unist’ot’en camp is an example of resistance that everyone is watching.

ELSIPOGTOG: NO FRACKING WAY!

October 2013 the Royal Canadian Mounted Police descended on a peaceful anti-fracking protest led by the Mi’kmaq of Elsipogtog and their allies. In this film the voices of some of the people involved in the anti-fracking movement talk about what happened and why they took the stand against hydraulic fracturing and how the heavy handed police response has affected their people.

My Name Is Kahentiiosta by Alanis Obomsawin

This documentary short by Alanis Obomsawin tells the story of Kahentiiosta, a young Kahnawake Mohawk woman arrested after the Oka Crisis’ 78-day armed standoff in 1990. She was detained 4 days longer than the other women. Her crime? The prosecutor representing the Quebec government did not accept her aboriginal name.

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